Monday, June 04, 2018

Facebook 'Tried to Shut Down' a Pro-Life Roe v. Wade Film Produced by Martin Luther King Jr.'s Niece


By Tyler O'Neil | PJ Media

YouTube screenshot of Alveda King speaking about the Roe v. Wade film she is producing.

A pro-life film on the story of Roe v. Wade — the 1973 Supreme Court case that legalized abortion — is in the works and will begin filming this month. 

The project seems unpopular in Hollywood (big surprise), but the producers complained that even Facebook is trying to shut it down. 

Even Martin Luther King Jr.'s niece, pro-life activist Alveda King  (the executive producer of the film), was blocked from sharing a link to raise money for the film.

"We've had a lot of difficulty raising the money in Hollywood, so we decided to do a crowd-funder," Nick Loeb, an actor in "Den of Thieves" (2018) and co-producer of the Roe v. Wade film, told Fox News host Tucker Carlson.

"We created a crowdfund site called roevwademovie.com and we launched on Facebook to try to raise money and even Facebook tried to shut us down."

"They said we were spamming, they stopped us from sharing," Loeb added. "I couldn't send out our crowdfunding site to my friends or family, people who liked the site couldn't share it. Dr. Alveda King, who came on as executive producer, was also blocked from sharing it."

Facebook eventually lifted the block, but Loeb said the massive social media site has "created what's called a 'shadow ban' where when we post what we want to promote, it doesn't even show up in the feeds of the people that follow us or our friends, the people we like."

The producer alleged that Facebook even blocked them from paying for advertising. "We even bought and paid for advertising, and they blocked us from sharing paid advertising, so it's been a real struggle to get people to go to RoeV.WadeMovie.com," Loeb said.

The producer confirmed to PJ Media on Sunday that the "shadow ban" was still in effect, but he added some good news: the exposure from his appearance on Tucker Carlson's show yielded a great deal of support for the Roe v. Wade film.

"It initially crashed our site and then was huge for us," Loeb told PJ Media. He said the Fox News appearance led to "an additional 50k" in fundraising for the film.

As of Sunday, the film had raised more than $106,000 on the crowdfunding site Freestartr. Even so, this represented a mere tenth of the goal — $1 million.

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The movie — which includes a few Hollywood conservatives like Jon Voight — aims to tell an important story. It alleges that the Supreme Court case legalizing abortion rested on a throne of lies.

"This big screen movie is the real untold story of how mountains of lies led to an injustice that has deprived millions of people of human dignity and human rights," Alveda King explained in a video about the film.

Abortionist Bernard Nathanson and feminist activist Betty Friedan allied with Planned Parenthood to find a pregnant girl to sue the government to get an abortion.

According to the story, the pro-abortion activists found an impoverished girl with a 10th grade education, Norma McCorvey, who became known as "Jane Roe." 

They convinced her that she could have an abortion if she sued, even though they knew her case would not get through the courts in time. 

McCorvey sued Henry Wade, the district attorney of Dallas County, Texas.

According to the filmmakers, abortion activists convinced the Supreme Court justices to vote their way by feeding fake polls and fake statistics to the media.

Nathanson, Friedan, and Planned Parenthood even directed Hollywood to produce TV shows and movies about abortion.

The Roe v. Wade movie isn't just about the effort to legalize abortion, however.

The film will also focus on those fighting this effort, primary among them Mildred Jefferson, the first African American woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School.

"Not only was she trying to save lives, she was trying to save her race," the movie's fundraising page declares. 

Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, created an initiative called the Negro project, and she gave a speech at a Ku Klux Klan rally.

Despite Jefferson's efforts, the Supreme Court struck down laws against abortion.

After the decision, however, both "Roe" and the abortionist who helped convince her to sue for an abortion, Dr. Bernard Nathanson, grew to lament their legalization of abortion.

"At the end of the movie Bernard [Nathanson] through the help of new sonogram technology, realizes he is killing babies, confesses to all the lies and becomes a leading activist in the pro-life movement." 

McCorvey, the notorious "Roe," realized she was manipulated and joined the pro-life movement.

"Hollywood and the Mainstream Media continue to squash the truth," Alveda King argued. 

According to Nick Loeb, Facebook has joined in that effort as well. While Facebook stopped blocking users from sharing the link to the film's crowdfunding site, the "shadow ban" remains troubling. 

However, it is difficult to determine whether this is abnormal, or if it boils down to the recent algorithm change referred to as the "Facebook marketing apocalypse."

To support the film, pro-life Americans can go to RoeVWadeMovie.com.