Wednesday, March 01, 2017

Viewers strongly approve of Trump's speech to Congress


By Anthony Salvanto, Sarah Dutton, Jennifer De Pinto, Fred Backus and Kabir Khanna 

“In 2016, the earth shifted beneath our feet,” he said, saying that a “rebellion” that started as “a quiet protest” morphed into “a loud chorus” and finally “an earthquake.”
 

Viewers nationwide strongly approved of President Trump’s speech Tuesday night, with many Democrats joining Republicans in calling it “presidential” and positive in tone. Republicans and Independents found it “unifying,” though Democrats were slower to come around on that measure.
The President gained support for his policy plans among viewers: Interviewed before and after the address, they came away from it more positive on his ideas for the economy, immigration, terrorism, crime and Obamacare. 
As is often the case in addresses to Congress, those who watched were more likely to be from the president’s party – in this case, Republicans. And they described a president they felt was keeping campaign promises and offering an “inspiring” message.
While half of Democrats found the speech “divisive,” about one-third of them also said Mr. Trump was “specific” and “knowledgeable”; neither label drew a majority, but nonetheless sizeable numbers compared to the more negative reactions Democrats have had to other aspects of his presidency.
And viewers of all stripes described the speech as at least somewhat positive in tone.
Overall, most watchers approved of the speech. Republicans did tune in to watch it in much greater numbers than Democrats (as a president’s party typically does) which bolstered those approval numbers. Forty percent of Democrats at least somewhat approved; 18 percent strongly approved.
The president moved opinion among viewers on his plans for a number of policy issues, comparing their views before and after the speech. The percent favoring his plans for fighting terrorism, addressing crime, improving the economy, handling illegal immigration, and dealing with Obamacare all jumped.
Republicans and Democrats did see the president’s description of the country quite differently. Most Republicans think Mr. Trump’s depiction of the state of America is accurate, while six in 10 Democrats think the President’s description is worse than the country really is.
There is agreement across party lines that Mr. Trump is trying to do what he said he’d do during the campaign.
Reacting to the president’s description of the economy as he took office, Republicans and independents think he did inherit a bad economy, while three in four Democrats think the president took over an economy that was already improving.
Majorities overall were positive toward his plans for the military, trade, foreign policy, the budget deficit, and taxes. The president won favor from viewers for his plans to build roads and bridges -- the one issue on which his approach appealed to most Democrats as well as nearly all Republicans.
For Republicans and independents, the speech boosted optimism about what the administration will do moving forward. Just a quarter of Democrats felt more optimistic.
As is typical for a presidential speech, viewers tended to come more from the president’s own party; in this case more Republicans tuned in. Historically, a president’s partisans are much more likely than others to watch an address to Congress or State of the Union.
The poll was conducted immediately after the conclusion of the president’s address to Congress by re-contacting a scientifically sampled panel of Americans who had first been interviewed in the days leading up to the speech and had stated that they planned to watch. A total of 857 speech watchers were interviewed. The margin of error for the total sample is 4.2 points.

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VIEW THE FULL SPEECH: President Trump's address to a joint session of Congress

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Ex-Labor Secretary Tom Perez elected DNC chairman

By Aaron Short

Tom Perez AP

Former US Labor Secretary Tom Perez edged Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison by 35 votes Saturday to become the head of the Democratic National Committee.
He promptly called President Trump “the worst president in the history of the United States.”
….

But Ellison, who is a Muslim, was damaged by criticism from pro-Israel organizations and slams from major Democratic donors who blasted his past associations with the Nation of Islam.

Saturday, February 25, 2017

President Trump electrifies CPAC crowd, bashing media and vowing aggressive agenda

By Barnini Chakraborty


President Trump made a historic return Friday to the Conservative Political Action Conference, telling the crowd, ‘You finally have a president,’ and delivering a wide-ranging speech in which he took aim at ISIS, pushed his plans to combat illegal immigration and vowed to repeal and replace ObamaCare.

White House Video: President Trump Delivers Remarks at CPAC

He started with a familiar attack on the news media and went so far as to say reporters “shouldn’t be allowed to use sources unless they use somebody’s name.”

"Let them say it to my face. Let there be no more sources," Trump said, though some of his administration officials recently have held briefings where they insisted no names be used.

"I'm not against the media," Trump said. "I'm against the people that make up stories and make up sources."

Trump moved on to defend his agenda and vow major action ahead. On immigration, Trump touted plans for a southern border wall with Mexico and said it was “way, way, way ahead of schedule.”

The speech came as Republicans control Congress and the White House for the first time in a decade. Conservatives have been optimistic about the opportunity to enact big policy changes and looked to Trump to spell out his agenda.

“You finally have a president,” he told the packed room at the 44th annual conference, held this year at National Harbor, Md. “It took you a long time. It’s patriots like you that made it happen.”

In addition to media bashing, Trump's characteristically muscular speech included a defense of his crackdown on illegal immigration.

"We're getting the bad ones out," he said, explaining that the Department of Homeland Security is prioritizing deportation of illegal immigrant criminals.

He repeated his pledge to repeal and replace ObamaCare, an effort that seems stalled in Congress, and touted his effort to get key oil pipelines back on track.

"We're checking off the promises we made to the people of the United States," Trump thundered.

Trump drew raucous applause when he vowed to rebuild the U.S. military and spoke of putting America first, a familiar theme from his campaign.

"I'm not representing the globe," Trump said. "I'm representing your country."

The speech ended with the campaign theme song, "You Can't Always Get What You Want," the Rolling Stones early 1970s hit played at Trump rallies.

The president’s speech at CPAC also served as a prelude to his first State of the Union-style speech to Congress Tuesday night.

On Thursday night, Vice President Mike Pence as well as key White House advisers spoke at the annual gathering.

“We conservatives have an opportunity to that only comes around every few generations,” Pence told a pumped-up crowd. “My friends, this is our time.”

White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus shared the CPAC stage in the afternoon. The two top White House aides praised one another, bashed the press and laid the groundwork for Trump’s Friday speech.

Also making a CPAC appearance was White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway who teased Trump’s appearance: “Tomorrow it will be TPAC when (Trump’s) here.”

The conference, which is hosted by the American Conservative Union, began in 1974 and has since grown into a four-day- event. A closely watched straw poll will be conducted Saturday, the last day.

Trump's appearance Friday marks the fourth visit by a sitting president.

Trump made his first speech at CPAC in 2011. At the time, he floated the possibility of a 2012 presidential run – a nomination that was won by former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.

He returned in 2015 and was booed after telling the crowd he wanted to use U.S. ground troops to fight ISIS.

Last year, Trump was scheduled to speak at the conservative confab but cancelled at the last minute, saying he would campaign in Kansas and Florida instead.

At the time, the American Conservative Union criticized the move and said his decision sent “a clear message to grassroots conservatives.”


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The Media’s Public Suicide

By Kathleen Dynan

On February 16th, President Donald Trump hastened the public suicide of the media. This un-elected, self-important, elitist machine is driving itself into oblivion.

Since Donald J. Trump announced his candidacy for President of the United States, the media has evolved into a hate-filled, unwanted nuisance. Although they fancy themselves as the fourth branch of government, The United States Constitution defines only three branches of our Federal Government.

In Article I, all legislative powers are granted to the Congress. The importance of law in the United States of America is emphasized by the fact that it is the first of the three branches defined. To the great dismay of Liberals and Progressives, there are laws in America that forbid illegal immigration and the President must enforce them. Oh horror!

Article II gives the President of the United States the Executive power. The responsibilities of this position include: enforcing America’s laws; leading the Armed Forces as Commander-in-Chief; and preserving, protecting and defending the Constitution of the United States. As an Executive, the President must set the course for the country and lead. It has been so long since the United States had a real leader and not a game-playing, self-enhancing elitist posing as a leader that this is a new experience for many. Elites are petrified that Americans will appreciate the difference and demand it in all future Presidents. O Joy!

In Article III, the judicial branch is charged to review all Cases under the microscope of their legality, how they do or do not conform to our Constitution and existing law. Contrary to the behavior of too many, Judges are not permitted to change laws and make decisions based on their personal views or the public’s wishes. Do your job!

Article III also defines Treason against the United States as “levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort”. Citizens and legal residents intending to harm us by their actions commit treason. Government personnel who leak confidential information and the media who publish this leaked information are weakening America and giving Aid and Comfort to our enemies. In their attempts to undermine and destroy our President, has this unwanted nuisance descended into Treason? You decide!

So, although President Trump’s ongoing decimation of the media is good entertainment, the public is being cheated by the lack of an unbiased, honest, responsible, fact-based source of information about our many-faceted world. Perhaps after those current members of the media self-destruct due to their over-reaching, truth does not matter, America’s safety be damned, we know best about everything behaviors, responsible journalists will replace them. O please!

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Trump Shouldn't Rush to Meet Congressional Black Caucus

By Clarence V. McKee



U.S. Democratic Representative from New York and chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus Political Action Committee (CBCPAC) Gregory Meeks announces the CBCPAC's endorsement of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton for the November election, in Washington, D.C, on February 11, 2016. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)


________________

Rep. Cummings Tells Dems to Accept Trump As Legitimate President And Get to Work
By Cortney O’Brien


Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) rejects his colleague John Lewis' (D-GA) assertion that Donald Trump is not a legitimate president. Lewis led the inauguration boycott last month that left about 70 seats empty at his swearing in ceremony.

Cummings has repeatedly suggested that is the wrong attitude - not to mention unproductive.
“I think we have to work with him," Cummings said on CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday. "I’ve got people who -- you know, I keep telling people, this is our president. He’s going to be our president for the next four years. I’ve got people in my community who are suffering from cancer. They need treatment. I’ve got people who need jobs, and I’ve got to work with this president, but at the same time, there’s nobody that has been tougher on this president than I have been,” Cummings said.
When asked at his press conference last week if he plans to meet with the Congressional Black Caucus to discuss matters important to the African-American community, Trump insisted he'd be happy to, but Rep. Cummings had not returned any of his calls. Cummings rejected that claim, yet said he too would be glad to schedule a meeting. Trump and the CBC are expected to sit down and chat next week.
 
Trump has indicated many times that his ear is open to the needs of the African-American community. He has offered key White House positions to African-Americans, including Ben Carson for HUD secretary and Omarosa Manigault to help with public engagement. He met with several African-American leaders to recognize Black History Month early in February and, most recently, he spent his Tuesday morning at The National Museum of African American History and Culture.


_______________

President Trump Visits the African American History Museum 

President Trump talks to Smithsonian Secretary David Skorton in front of the "Paradox of Liberty" exhibit. (Associated Press)

By Jackie Mansky
President Donald Trump toured the Smithsonian’s newest museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, for the first time on Tuesday morning.
“This is a truly great museum,” Trump told reporters during a press appearance following his visit. “I’ve learned and I’ve seen and they’ve done an incredible job."
President Donald Trump delivers remarks after touring the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on Feb. 21, 2017, in Washington, D.C. Trump was joined by Dr. Ben Carson and Alveda King. (Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images)

Click here to view President Trump’s Remarks.

Museum director Lonnie Bunch and Smithsonian Secretary David Skorton led the tour for the president, who was accompanied by the nominee for Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Ben Carson and his wife, Candy, Alveda King, the niece of Martin Luther King Jr., Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina, presidential aide Omarosa Manigault and his daughter Ivanka Trump.

As they stood in front of the “Paradox of Liberty” exhibit, Bunch discussed how each of the 612 bricks flanking a statue of Thomas Jefferson were inscribed with the name of an enslaved worker Jefferson owned.
“You can’t understand Jefferson without understanding slavery,” Bunch said. Even more than that, he added, the point of the exhibit is to explore the forgotten people that shaped America. “For us, this whole museum is about humanizing stories of people that have been left out of history.”
During his stay, Trump hailed the exhibit about Ben Carson in the “Making a Way Out of No Way” gallery. “We’re proud of Ben, very proud of Ben, especially Candy,” he said, referring to Carson's wife.
The president’s visit during Black History Month provided an opportunity for him to touch on his frequent promise to deescalate racial tensions in the country. "We have a divided country. It’s been divided for many, many years. But we’re going to bring it together," he said.
Before leaving, the president promised to return to the museum soon. “What they’ve done here is something that probably cannot be duplicated,” he said. ”It was done with love and lots of money, right Lonnie? We can’t avoid that. But it was done with tremendous love and passion and that’s why it’s so great.”

___________
 The White House: President Trump’s Messages

___________
View President Trump's Weekly Address Videos
 
 
 
 

Newsmax 's 50 Most Influential African-American Republicans



Newsmax's 50 Most Influential African-American Republicans

By Frances Rice


Ben Carson (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images), Alveda King (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images), Clarence Thomas (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)


 Click here to view the list.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Tyrannical Fascist “Social Justice” Warriors Propagandize Our Youth




As administrators foist ‘social justice’ on 4,000 suburban students, parents plead for balance.

By Peter Berkowitz  

What passes for education at many American public schools is too often closer to indoctrination. Consider the seminar day that New Trier High School, in Winnetka, Ill., on Chicago’s affluent North Shore, is planning for Feb. 28.

The title for the all-school seminar is “Understanding Today’s Struggle for Racial Civil Rights.” That very term, “racial civil rights,” is misleading, since civil rights protect Americans’ freedoms regardless of their race. Judging from the roster of scheduled events, the seminar might be more accurately titled “Inculcating a Progressive View of Social Justice.”

Here are a few of the offerings scheduled for presentation to New Trier’s roughly 4,000 students:

“SPENT: A Simulation to See How Long You Can Survive on Minimum Wage”—which touches on race at best tangentially.

“Developing a Positive, Accountable White Activism for Racial Civil Rights”—which promotes a divisive view of race as a primordial fact, the essence of identity, a bright line between oppressed and oppressor.

“One Person One Vote: Can the Voting Rights Act Be Saved?”—which absurdly suggests that the Voting Rights Act is at risk of being repealed.

There are plenty of sessions on the connections that music, art and culture have with civil rights. Very little programming, however, is devoted to actually explaining to students what civil rights are and what their place is in this country’s political tradition.

Yet the continuing quest to fulfill America’s founding promise is unintelligible without a grasp of how civil rights are grounded in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

Or without an understanding of the often-heroic struggle for civil rights over the course of American history—the abolition movement, the Civil War, the great Reconstruction constitutional amendments, the grievous setback of Jim Crow, the modern civil-rights movement, the landmark Supreme Court cases like Brown v. Board of Education.

Instead of teaching, the school’s aim seems to be hammering home to students that racism plagues America and will persist until white people admit their unjust privilege, renounce their unearned power, and make amends for the entrenched oppression from which they continue to profit handsomely.

This despite the school board’s written policy to provide a “balanced view” on “controversial issues,” and the seminar’s stated purpose “not to promote the philosophy of one political party or another.”

On Monday a group of concerned New Trier parents will make a final attempt to persuade the school board to alter the seminar’s programming to include a diversity of views about race and rights in America.

The parents have proposed, for example, inviting black conservative intellectuals—such as my Hoover Institution colleague Shelby Steele and this newspaper’s Jason Riley—or people like Pastor Corey Brooks, the director of Project Hood, which seeks to end violence and build communities on Chicago’s South Side.

So far, these efforts have been met with stonewalling and vitriol.

On Feb. 6, a group of recent New Trier graduates—some of whom helped plan the seminar day—published an open letter to explain why the parents’ proposals are unreasonable and immoral.

The letter opens with a long quotation from Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1963 masterpiece, “Letter From a Birmingham Jail.”

The implicit message is that the New Trier parents are comparable to the “white moderate” King reproaches for preferring order to justice.

King’s admonition to the comfortable—to imagine themselves in the place of the persecuted and downtrodden—is a timeless message, but inapt for the situation. New Trier failed to teach the letter writers the distinction between political activism and education.

The seminar day presupposes that the pervasiveness and potency of racism in America are facts beyond dispute, rather than hypotheses to be critically examined.

That’s why the letter writers dismiss the parents’ desire for a multiplicity of views as an effort “to distract the conversation.”

Let’s hope that the concerned New Trier parents succeed Monday [February 20th] in teaching the New Trier school board about education’s proper purpose.

If not, maybe the best thing might be for more families to follow the parent group’s advice: “Excuse your child for the day, and encourage him or her to volunteer”—perhaps with Corey Brooks and Project Hood.

Mr. Berkowitz is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/its-racial-indoctrination-day-at-an-upscale-chicagoland-school-1487375679

_________________

11-Year-Old Docked Points for Not Bashing Trump

By Tom Knighton


To say that some people dislike Donald Trump may well be the understatement of the year. It's hard to imagine any duly elected president seeing so many protests in his first two months in office, yet here we are.
It's so bad that now an 11-year-old in Annadale, New York, was docked 15 points on a homework assignment because she failed to answer a question demanding students bash Trump.
Vincent Ungro, a dad from Annadale, New York, has an 11-year-old daughter who attends I.S. (Intermediate School) 75. She asked him for help with her vocabulary homework last Friday night because she was trying to fill in the blanks from a word bank to complete her assignment -- and was really puzzled.
“President Trump speaks in a very superior and _________ manner insulting many people. He needs to be more __________ so that the American people respect and admire him,” read one homework sentence.
The next question was: “Barack Obama set a _________ when he became the first African-American president.”
And what were the choices for the two questions, you ask? These three words: “haughty,” “humble,” and “precedent.” You can guess which ones were meant to be the “correct” answers in this teacher’s mind.
Ungro, 46, told his daughter not to fill in those blanks -- and wrote a note to the teacher, Adria Zawatsky, on the homework sheet, as The Post noted. “Please keep your political views to yourself and do not try to influence my children on them. Thank you,” he wrote.
The teacher docked the points -- which Ungro called "vindictive."
The teacher emailed Ungro and defended her question, stating that she was addressing his personality rather than his ability to serve in the office of president. She went on to add that the media makes similar references to Trump, and that she believes she has the same right.

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School District to Hold 'Black Lives Matter' Day

By PJ Media

Image by Tony Webster

The Rochester City School District will hold a "Black Lives Matters Day" following an effort to establish the special day by teachers and parents.
Friday, February 17 has been designated as a day of understanding and affirmation in city schools that while all lives matter, black lives deserve special affirmation, attention and understanding right now.
Chris Widmaier, a science teacher at World of Inquiry School is one of the organizers of the event.
He said there has been some criticism of the effort from outside the school community.
If you think this is unusual, you are not alone. The school has gotten some criticism.
"Our response to that is there's enough love to go around for everybody. We can affirm that black lives matter and that doesn't diminish other peoples' lives or identifies in any other way," said Widmaier.
So what will "Black Lives Matter Day" look like?
Widmaier said there are a number of ways teachers and students can participate in the Black Lives Matter at School day, such as inviting local activists and experts as guest speakers, initiating classroom discussions, or wearing t-shirts and stickers to show their support.
"People can come to this in a way that they're ready. So, if they're uncomfortable, the first step might just be to study more and do some reading about Black Lives Matter."

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'Shame! Shame!' Protesters Block Ed Sec Betsy DeVos from Entering School

By Tyler O'Neil
Twitter video screenshot of a protester yelling at Ed Sec Betsy DeVos.
Early on Thursday morning [February 9th], a group of protesters physically blocked Education Secretary Betsy DeVos from entering a school in Washington, D.C., yelling at her and even blocking her van when she attempted to leave.

"Keep giving money to senators and buying your way to the position -- you should be so proud of yourself," one of the protesters yelled at DeVos as she turned away from the school door. As the secretary entered the motorcade, a protester yelled, "Shame! Shame! Shame!"
Even when the van attempted to pull away, one of the protesters ran in front of it, holding a "Black Lives Matter" sign to obstruct the vehicle.
The racial message is particularly interesting, since black leaders have praised DeVos for caring about children in their community.
"She's not African American, but she's concerned about our children," Dr. Dwight Montgomery, president of the Memphis chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Council (SCLC, Martin Luther King, Jr.'s organization), said of DeVos.
But the protest should not be surprising, coming as it does after months of liberal attacks on Trump's pick to head the Department of Education. Liberals branded DeVos a racist, an elitist, a foe of public education, a religious extremist, and even — in a harebrained attack — a supporter of child labor.
Much of this opposition can be explained by DeVos' championing of school choice, which terrifies teachers' unions. It is true that DeVos has no direct experience teaching children or managing school districts, but she has been deeply involved in the movement to expand educational options in her home state of Michigan and across the country.
DeVos was confirmed when Vice President Mike Pence broke a tie in the Senate.


Monday, February 20, 2017

Trump selects Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster as national security adviser


President Trump on Monday tapped Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, a warrior-scholar deemed an expert in counter insurgency, to be the director of the White House's National Security Council.

The 54-year-old McMaster replaces retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn as the president’s national security adviser. Flynn was forced to resign after lying about talking to Russia, before he officially took the NSA post, about recently imposed sanctions.
“He is a man of tremendous talent and experience,” Trump said in announcing McMaster’s appointment. “He’s highly respected in the military, and we're lucky to have him.”
Trump also announced that Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg will remain as the NSC’s chief of staff.

“I’m proud to continue my service to the nation,” said McMaster, sitting next to Trump inside the president’s Florida resort home Mar-a-Lago.

Trump on Sunday interviewed several NSC candidates, in an attempt to solidify the intelligence team, days after calling for Flynn’s resignation.

McMaster is a Philadelphia native and West Point graduate who fought in the Persian Gulf War and served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“This is a great team,” Trump said. “The country is honored to have two people like this, and after having met so many people in the military, we're lucky to have all of them.”

Said Kellogg: "I'm honored and privileged to serve alongside Gen. McMaster. He's a great statesman."
Trump also thanked the others he interviewed this past weekend including former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton.
The president said Bolton has “a good number of ideas that I agree with very much" and that he will work for him in a “different capacity.”
McMaster is currently director of the Army Capabilities Integration Center. He joined the Army in 1984 and distinguished himself seven years later during the Gulf War in what would become known as the Battle of 73 Easting.
As captain of the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment's Eagle Troop, McMaster led a force of just nine tanks that took out more than 80 Iraqi Republican Guard tanks and armored vehicles.
He is the author of the 1997 book, "Dereliction of Duty," which criticized the U.S. government's handling of the Vietnam War.
In his latest role, McMaster was tasked with gauging the U.S, military capability against future threats. When he addressed lawmakers in April of last year, he warned that years of military cuts have left the U.S. vulnerable.
“We are outranged and outgunned by many potential adversaries,” McMaster said. “[And] our army in the future risks being too small to secure the nation.”